What’s the difference between the Roland TD11 range?

td11comp

Roland recently added another kit to their great range of electronic drums. The TD-11KVSE is the latest kit in the range to use the TD11 module, making a total of three kits, all with the same module and very similar names. So, what are the differences between this trio of TD11s? Why would you choose a TD-11KVSE over a TD-11K? Why are three models now? Read on and hopefully we can clear this up for you!

The TD11 in one form or another has proved to be incredibly popular. In fact, the TD-11KV is our best selling kit here, due to being the first Roland kit on the market with all mesh heads for around about £1000. All the sound on a V-Drum kit comes from a sound module or “brain” which picks up the signals coming from the pads and turns them into great drum sounds. This is also where the drum kits get their names from. TD-11 is the name for the module and the letters which follow this refer to the specific combination of pads, stand and hardware. The 3 models in the range are the TD-11K, TD-11KV and now TD-11KVSE. The module itself is amazing value for money. It has 50 kits (25 preset, 25 user) and over 100 sounds to choose from. The sounds use Roland’s unique SuperNatural sound engine which uses a unique form of behavioural modelling to recreate the response, sound and crucially the behaviour of an acoustic drum. The rims of the drums can be assigned to provide extra spaces for cowbells, tambourines and sound effects, allowing you to almost double the amount of sounds on a kit! Additionally, there’s the facility to jam along with backing tracks, either built in or your own (via USB stick) a “Rhythm Coach” to keep you timing and rudiments in check and you can even record yourself!

So that’s the module taken care of, let’s have a look at the kits themselves.


 

td11k

TD-11K – This is the most affordable kit in the range and is great for someone who is looking for a full V-Drum kit for well under £1000. It uses an 8” PDX-8 mesh drum for the snare, and 3 rubber 8” PD-8 pads for the toms. The hi-hat is a 5” CY-5 with a FD-8 control pedal to open and close it and the bass drum is a highly responsive KD-9 pad. The crash and ride cymbals are both 8” CY-8 dual-trigger cymbal pads. All these drums sit on a MDS-4V which is a compact, portable and very sturdy drum stand.


td11kv

TD-11KV – This is the first kit in the range to use mesh drums for the snare and all the toms as well as higher end cymbals. It uses the same stand, hi-hat system, snare and kick pedal as the TD-11K above but instead of rubber toms, it uses 2 PDX-6 pads for rack toms and an additional PDX-8 for the floor tom. The cymbals are more responsive and realistic too, with a CY-12C for the crash and CY-13R 3-way cymbal for the ride. These cymbals tend to swing more like an acoustic cymbal and the ride cymbal has 3 zones of sensing on it allowing you trigger the bell, bow and edge sounds. So why would you choose this kit over the cheaper TD-11K? Mesh heads feel more like playing an acoustic kit and they can be tightened just like an acoustic skin allowing you get the tension just right and to be honest, they just feel better! They are also a bit quieter so if neighbours are a concern, there’s slightly less physical noise. Combine this with the more expressive cymbals and it’s easy to see why it’s our best selling electronic drum kit!


td11kvse

TD-11KV SE – Do you like everything about the TD-11KV but just want something a bit bigger? Well look no further than the TD-11KVSE! This kit has all the same drums as the TD11KV except it sits on a larger MDS-9C stand allowing greater flexibility with pad placement and height. It also comes with the VH-11 hi-hat system which means the hi-hat actually fits on to a hi-hat stand and moves up and down the way you’d expect a hi-hat to. This is something normally reserved for kits much higher in price! The icing on the cake is an extra CY12C crash cymbal meaning that you now get 2 crashes instead of 1. I’d recommend this kit for taller drummers and for those who like the idea of being more physically flexible with the layout of the pads. The larger stand can accommodate larger drums leaving more scope for updating further down the line. Lastly, the VH-11 hi-hat feels even more natural and responsive due to its larger size and placement on a hi-hat stand.


So there’s a kit for every budget and every ability but which one is right for you? That question can be best answered by popping in to one of our stores to try each of the kits yourself. If that’s not an option, why not give me a call or email and I can gladly answer any questions you might have and talk you through the V-Drums in more detail. In the meantime, here’s a comparison chart.

td11kcomp

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