Seven reasons why the Korg Minilogue is the best synth for slightly over £500

Korg introduced the Minilogue in 2016, and since its release, it’s been flying off the shelves – and it’s easy to see why. In addition to the fact that it’s simply a fantastic little analogue synth, here are seven reasons why it’s so incredible:

The best synth that costs about £500?

The Price –

Let’s start with an obvious one, for just a little over £500, you get a solid, well built and versatile four voice polysynth, making it much cheaper than the vast majority of other analogue / digital hybrid options.

The Look –

The Minologue is a truly beautiful instrument. The wooden panel at the rear is incredibly stylish, and it’s one of the most distinctive looking synths to be released in recent years. The brushed metal curved control panel means it looks as at home in a Scandinavian kitchen as it does in your studio.

Korg Minilogue - best synth for around £500

Versatility –

There are 200 memories on the Minilogue – 100 preset sounds that can’t be overwritten, and 100 user memories. The user memories do a great job of showing you the various capabilities of the synth, and editing them is a great place to start with making your own sounds. It’s capable of everything from Moog Sub37 style arpeggiated leads to MS2000 style ambient chords.

Build Quality – 

Although a budget friendly model, make no mistake – the Korg Minilogue is built to last. The aluminium top panel feels really solid, and the plastic underbelly is hard and robust. The knobs are all easy to use, and clearly labelled too.

Korg Minilogue - the best value analogue synth?

Ease of Use – 

I’m yet to find an analogue synth that I can just get out of the box and understand immediately, but the Korg Minilogue was pretty close to that. I watched the Korg demo video, and was ready to go. It’s simple and intuitive, and you don’t need to waste weeks memorising the manual.

Voicing Options – 

As you know, the Minilogue is a 4 voice polyphonic synth, but there are several voice options to choose from too: poly, duo, unison, mono, chord, delay, arp and sidechain. This is such a great feature to have at your disposal, and it brings so much more out of the synth.

Korg Minilogue ins and outs

Portability –

The Minilogue is incredibly lightweight – weighing only 2.8kg – and, despite being a 37 key board, it’s still only 50cm long. This is partly due to the Minilogue’s keys. They’re smaller than standard piano keys, so they allow the synth to remain compact and lightweight, but they’re larger than the miniature keys on a lot of other synths, so they’re still comfortable to play.

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Chris Milnes

Christopher Milnes is a Leeds-based musician and music producer. He’s received various awards and scholarships for his music production work, notably The David Thompson Scholarship, and the O2 Think Bigger award, as well as the conservatoire prize at Leeds College of Music. His work has been broadcast on BBC radio 1, BBC Radio 3, and many other radio and TV stations.

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