Buying your first digital piano: what you need to consider

 


Looking for the Edinburgh Christmas party? Try here; really this time!


 

I’ve previously argued why it’s worth investing in a digital piano over an acoustic so, presuming I managed to convince you, this article is here to help you progress with your digital piano purchase.

Digital pianos are wonderful things and there are a huge range of options you can go for, from instruments under £300 to over £10,000. How do you negotiate all the different options on the market and find something that suits you and your budget?

Roland FP30 Set

The Roland FP-30 is a great choice for your first piano…

I’d suggest the main things you need to consider are as follows:

  • Size: Will it fit in your home without getting in the way? If you’re going to be taking it out for gigging, is it light enough to be portable?
  • Quality of Sound: Is the piano sound realistic? Does it have the subtle tonal nuances of an acoustic piano? Does it sound nice to your ears?
  • Quantity of Sounds: Do you want sounds to play around with other than piano sounds? Many digital pianos come with everything from full string sections to guitars to sound effects and everything in between. These may not be the primary reason for you buying the piano, but they can be a lot of fun and widen the performance potential of the instrument.
  • Style: Does it look nice to you? Will it look nice in your home? Will it suit your other furniture?
  • Action: Does it feel like a Steinway Grand to play, or like a 1980s computer keyboard? Does it feel as if there are real hammers moving when you hit the keys?
  • Speakers: Do you need speakers built in, or will you plug it into your home sound system? If you do want speakers, how many? Higher end digital pianos have an array of speakers to mimic the way sound comes out of an acoustic piano.
  • Additional Features: A digital piano can be more than just an instrument. Many modern models feature Bluetooth so you could e.g. stream music from your phone onto the piano, effectively giving you a whole new sound system. There are also free apps that accompany certain pianos that help you learn to play and practice.

There’s one important consideration that you may have noticed that I omitted: budget. Obviously you can’t spend more than you have (well, you kind of can with our online finance and buy now pay later schemes, but that’s a different question), but it is always worthwhile identifying the ideal digital piano first and then, if it isn’t within your budget, scaling back features one-by-one. This way you know that you’re getting the very best for your money.

I hope this guide’s been helpful. Good luck with your search and, if you have any questions or would like to get hands on with the huge range of digital pianos we hold in stock, don’t hesitate to get in touch with us here at Red Dog Music Edinburgh, London or Leeds, or contact us via the website.

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Guitar-plucker, piano-tinkler, sonic-mangler, Red Dog Music-owner, lion-tamer, and Weetabix-devourer. One (or more) of these is a lie.

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